Casino Square, Saturday morning

Casino Square, Saturday morning

There are few more exhilarating pieces of real estate than Monaco’s Casino Square on Grand Prix Saturday so this year I recorded my thoughts and impressions on this podcast:

I also took a few photos to illustrate some of the dynamics on view – specifically at the entry to the square, where the road is positively-cambered and then bumpy, and the guardrail is at its most forbidding.  It is here, as the cars burst Casino Square, Saturday morning 2into sight at a variety of different angles, that the spectrum of techniques can best be appreciated.  (The professional photographers, like those on the left, very rarely face this entry to the Square.  The more scenic – more dramatic – shot is of the backs of the cars as they accelerate downhill.  This is indeed a visual treat – but by then the job for the driver at Casino is three-quarters over: providing he has manipulated the entry well, the second phase of the right-hander is mainly about driving the car to a specific exit point between 6-12in from the Armco.  The problem arises when the driver asks too much of the car because of incorrect – or insufficient – early/mid-corner manipulation going into the left-hander.  This, then, is the key area.)

These are not great photographs; I concede that.  Hopefully, though, they give some idea of what I’m trying to describe in the video. I’ve also added a shot I took at the entry to the pit lane. As if he knew we were heading to Casino Square, there was Jo Siffert, as cool as ever.

Lewis Hamilton: perfectly poised thanks to his decreasing brake pedal pressure/steering load/throttle tease mid-corner manipulation (all of which has taken place just prior to this photo being taken).  By the time he came into view at Casino, Lewis’s car looked as if it was on rails, with a massive amount of road on which to dance

Casino Square, Saturday morning 3

Nico Rosberg: because in the milliseconds prior to this photo being taken he has been manipulating the rear less effectively than Lewis, Nico is now obliged to ask more of the car mid-corner – and then of the left-front as he immediately transfers the load and turns towards the right-hander (see Seb Vettel below).  Nico’ judgement is superb in terms of car placement but his relatively poor mid-corner manipulation leaves him with no room in which to play when he’s on a really quick lap…which is why he resorted later in qualifying to something as basic as late-braking into Ste Devote.  Therein lay the difference between Lewis and Nico at Monaco this year

Casino Square, Saturday morning 4

Daniel Ricciardo – despite the Red Bull RB11-Renault being a more “darty” car than the Mercedes, he still created a nice mid-Casino Square transition zone via spectacular manipulations of the rear

Casino Square, Saturday morning 5

Daniil Kvyat – slightly sharper edges to his inputs but on the same path as Daniel

Casino Square, Saturday morning 6

Sebastian Vettel – always fearsome here, with understeer dictating his entry, particularly on the prime tyre.  He and Nico Rosberg were very similar in style through Casino but the Ferrari’s slightly inferior grip level made it all the more dramatic

Casino Square, Saturday morning 7

Felipe Nasr – impressively neat in the Sauber (but not as “flat” in the transition stage as Lewis or the RBR guys)

Casino Square, Saturday morning 8

Max Verstappen: very like Lewis through Casino (with Carlos Sainz right there with him)

Casino Square, Saturday morning 9

Postscript:  when horsepower was everything at Casino Square

Casino Square, Saturday morning 10

 

Perfil de Peter Windsor:

Peter WindsorBorn in the UK (1952) but raised in Sydney, Australia, Peter became Press Officer of the Australian Automobile Racing Club (AARC) at the age of 17 and played an active role in the organization of the famous Warwick Farm circuit near Liverpool, Sydney.

Peter joined Williams full-time in 1985 as Manager of Sponsorship and Public Affairs but switched to Ferrari in 1989 to manage their UK F1 facility. He then returned to Williams as Team Manager in 1991, winning both the Constructors’ and Drivers’ World Championships.After moving to the UK in 1972, Peter wrote for Competition Car magazine and was appointed Sports Editor of Autocar magazine in 1975. He went on to win five international awards for his writing, including Sports Reporter of the Year and Feature Writer of the Year. In 2013 he has also been awarded the Gold Medal of Imola by the Lorenzo Bandini Trophy Committee for his services to motor sport. Peter quickly diversified into F1 driver and team management, working with Frank Williams from 1978 onwards (developing Williams’ new Saudi sponsorship) and with drivers Carlos Reutemann and Nigel Mansell. Reutemann went on to finish runner-up in the 1981 World Championship and Mansell to win the title in 1992. Today he works closely with the world’s pre-eminent driver coach, Rob Wilson.

Peter was Grand Prix Editor of F1 Racing magazine from 1997-2009 and today is that magazine’s Senior Feature Writer and Columnist. He also writes for the BRDC Bulletin, AutoSport (Japan), the Goodwood magazine and presents his own, weekly, on-line chat show, The Racer’s Edge in association with F1 Racing magazine.

Peter Windsor en:


Web: http://www.peterwindsor.com

Canal de Youtube (The Racer’s Edge): http://www.youtube.com/peterwindsor

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F1 Racing: Web: http://www.f1racing.co.uk

Twitter F1 Racing: @F1Racing_mag

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Agradecemos a Peter Windsor por su colaboración en HolaQueretaro.com